Photo of Temple Lee
Duties:

Research Scientist

Programs:

Atmospheric Modeling and
Surface-Layer Meteorology

Contact:

temple.lee@noaa.gov
Office: (865) 220-1730

Current Research

My research is focused on improving scientific understanding of meteorological processes occurring within Earth’s atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). My recent work has focused on 1) using small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) to sample ABL thermodynamic and chemical characteristics, 2) the role of ABL processes and land surface heterogeneities on severe weather development, and 3) land-atmosphere interactions.

For more information on my research click here.

Selected publication references is available in pdf format here.
A more extensive listing of publications can be found on my website.

Education

University of Virginia

Ph.D., Environmental Science, 2015

M.S., Environmental Science, 2011

B.S., Environmental Science, 2007

Professional Experience

Research Scientist, Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, Norman, OK
working in-residence at the
NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, TN
2017 to present

Research Associate, NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, TN
2016 to 2017

Research Associate, Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS), College Park, MD
working in-residence at the
NOAA Air Resources Laboratory, Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division, Oak Ridge, TN
2015 to 2016

Research and Teaching Assistant, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
2008 to 2015

Research and Teaching Assistant, University at
Albany – State University of New York, Albany, NY
2007 to 2008

Research Assistant, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA
2005 to 2007

Research Assistant, National Weather Service Office, Wakefield, VA
2005

Tower and drone at Belle Mina, Alabama

Tower and drone used in experiments near
Belle Mina, Alabama
(click on image to enlarge)

Sensors on the tower provide heat fluxes that are used along with drone measurements to determine the spatial variability in heat fluxes using a technique developed at ATDD. The sensors also provide measurements for model initialization and evaluation.

More about my research

In my work, I rely upon a combination of measurements from field experiments and sophisticated high-resolution models of the atmosphere. These field experiments range from short, 1-day deployments up to large-scale studies of one month or longer. Recent field experiments have included the Verification of the Origins of Rotation in Tornadoes Experiment in the Southeast U.S. (VORTEX-SE) in spring 2016 and 2017, as well as the Land Atmosphere Feedback Experiment (LAFE) in August 2017. Knowledge gained by combining observations from these experiments with output from numerical simulations helps lead to better representations of ABL processes in numerical models of the atmosphere, resulting in improvements to weather forecasts.

Check out my “Research” page at https://sites.google.com/a/virginia.edu/t_lee/research for more in-depth information on my work.

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